ian rileyComment

ian rileyComment
        </iframe>" data-provider-name="YouTube"         I’ll admit. For the longest time, when shopping for pants (slacks, chinos, jeans) I’ll only look at the waist size and the inseam length: 34/30 preferably 34/29, I like the pants to hit the top of the shoe.  Little to no thought was given to the rise of the pants which is equally as important, that seems to be consistent with alot of male shoppers having worked at a clothing store before. The rise of a pants is described as the distance from the crotch of the pants to the waistband. I’ve also seen it measured from the front of the waistband, through the crotch to the bank of the waistband, my preferred way of measuring the rise. It determines where exactly the pants waistband will essentially sit on you. Different rises create different illusions on how proportional your body type is so as you can imagine certain rises are suitable for certain body types. Do pants rise make a difference for Fit Men? Let’s explore the different types and how applicable they are to our physique. As you’ll see, different rises determine the formality of the pants.   Low Rise      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     You typically find these with shorts, chinos and jean. Low rise pants sit on the hip of an individual. By doing this, it elongates the person’s torso and shorten their legs. Oddly enough, men tend to wear the pants low already so this makes it worse. Low rises tend to be 8” or less.   Short Rise      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Very hard to find but the best option for gentlemen of a modest statue. The short rise, when measured from the waistband to the crotch would be about 8” to 9” or less. This is ideal for shorter men who proportionally will have shorter legs and the short rise will sit on their natural waistline while also eliminates the extra bagginess in the crotch area one might get from a mid/regular rise.   Mid-Rise      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     This is the most common you’ll find on jeans and chinos. As known as the regular rise, the mid rise tends to be between 9-11 inches. This sits right above the hip but not quite at your natural waist line. Best for casual and not dress pants/tuxedo pants though that’s what you commonly see in today’s “modern” fast fashion. This is great for men of my height, 5’9 up to 6ft.   High Rise      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     These usually get a bad rap because folks automatically associate it with something “grandpa used to wear” in other words, oldschool or something that Urkle wear. In reality this, is satorially the best type of rise for your formal pants. The rise being 12” plus, it sits at your natural waist line which is right by the belly button. With it being so high up, it does the opposite effect to the low rise. This time it elongates the legs, and shortens the torso. With guys with longer legs and than their torso like, it will compliment it rather than exaggerate it further. An added benefit to high rise is that it further emphasizes a stream line look from the top (whether a jacket or vest) to the pants with no interruption of a belt, tie or shirt showing in between.    Final $0.02   It may take trial and error for you to see which rise you’re comfortable with. As always the fit is important and using your eyes you can tell if something fits right or not. A couple rule of thumbs I go by is I reserve the mid rise for my jeans and chinos(works for my height) and reserve my high rise for my dress pants.Also keep in mind that the rise of your pants will effect the inseam and how the pants fall on the shoe, another topic for another day. But use your eyes, trust yourself or your stylist and don’t walk around looking like this.

I’ll admit. For the longest time, when shopping for pants (slacks, chinos, jeans) I’ll only look at the waist size and the inseam length: 34/30 preferably 34/29, I like the pants to hit the top of the shoe. Little to no thought was given to the rise of the pants which is equally as important, that seems to be consistent with alot of male shoppers having worked at a clothing store before. The rise of a pants is described as the distance from the crotch of the pants to the waistband. I’ve also seen it measured from the front of the waistband, through the crotch to the bank of the waistband, my preferred way of measuring the rise. It determines where exactly the pants waistband will essentially sit on you. Different rises create different illusions on how proportional your body type is so as you can imagine certain rises are suitable for certain body types. Do pants rise make a difference for Fit Men? Let’s explore the different types and how applicable they are to our physique. As you’ll see, different rises determine the formality of the pants.

Low Rise

lowrise3.jpg

You typically find these with shorts, chinos and jean. Low rise pants sit on the hip of an individual. By doing this, it elongates the person’s torso and shorten their legs. Oddly enough, men tend to wear the pants low already so this makes it worse. Low rises tend to be 8” or less.

Short Rise

shortrise.png

Very hard to find but the best option for gentlemen of a modest statue. The short rise, when measured from the waistband to the crotch would be about 8” to 9” or less. This is ideal for shorter men who proportionally will have shorter legs and the short rise will sit on their natural waistline while also eliminates the extra bagginess in the crotch area one might get from a mid/regular rise.

Mid-Rise

midrise.jpg

This is the most common you’ll find on jeans and chinos. As known as the regular rise, the mid rise tends to be between 9-11 inches. This sits right above the hip but not quite at your natural waist line. Best for casual and not dress pants/tuxedo pants though that’s what you commonly see in today’s “modern” fast fashion. This is great for men of my height, 5’9 up to 6ft.

High Rise

IMG_4988.JPG

These usually get a bad rap because folks automatically associate it with something “grandpa used to wear” in other words, oldschool or something that Urkle wear. In reality this, is satorially the best type of rise for your formal pants. The rise being 12” plus, it sits at your natural waist line which is right by the belly button. With it being so high up, it does the opposite effect to the low rise. This time it elongates the legs, and shortens the torso. With guys with longer legs and than their torso like, it will compliment it rather than exaggerate it further. An added benefit to high rise is that it further emphasizes a stream line look from the top (whether a jacket or vest) to the pants with no interruption of a belt, tie or shirt showing in between.

Final $0.02

It may take trial and error for you to see which rise you’re comfortable with. As always the fit is important and using your eyes you can tell if something fits right or not. A couple rule of thumbs I go by is I reserve the mid rise for my jeans and chinos(works for my height) and reserve my high rise for my dress pants.Also keep in mind that the rise of your pants will effect the inseam and how the pants fall on the shoe, another topic for another day. But use your eyes, trust yourself or your stylist and don’t walk around looking like this.

final.jpg